Security

In-depth security news and investigation
  1. As the Coronavirus pandemic continues to force people to work from home, countless companies are now holding daily meetings using videoconferencing services from Zoom. But without the protection of a password, there's a decent chance your next Zoom meeting could be "Zoom bombed" -- attended or disrupted by someone who doesn't belong. And according to data gathered by a new automated Zoom meeting discovery tool dubbed "zWarDial," a crazy number major corporations are setting up meetings without passwords enabled.
  2. A spear-phishing attack this week hooked a customer service employee at GoDaddy.com, the world's largest domain name registrar, KrebsOnSecurity has learned. The incident gave the phisher the ability to view and modify key customer records, access that was used to briefly hijack domains for a half-dozen GoDaddy customers, including transaction brokering site escrow.com.
  3. In 2018, KrebsOnSecurity unmasked the creators of Coinhive -- a now-defunct cryptocurrency mining service that was being massively abused by cybercriminals -- as the administrators of a popular German language image-hosting forum. In protest of that story, forum members donated hundreds of thousands of euros to nonprofits that combat cancer (Krebs means "cancer" in German). This week, the forum is celebrating its third annual observance of that protest to "fight Krebs," albeit with a Coronavirus twist.
  4. Federal investigators in Russia have charged at least 25 people accused of operating a sprawling international credit card theft ring. Cybersecurity experts say the raid included the charging of a major carding kingpin thought to be tied to dozens of carding shops and to some of the bigger data breaches targeting western retailers over the past decade. In a statement released this week, the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) said 25 individuals were charged with circulating illegal means of payment in connection with some 90 websites that sold stolen credit card data.
  5. Many U.S. government Web sites now carry a message prominently at the top of their home pages meant to help visitors better distinguish between official U.S. government properties and phishing pages. Unfortunately, part of that message is misleading and may help perpetuate a popular misunderstanding about Web site security and trust that phishers have been exploiting for years now.

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